Left side advert image
Right side advert image
Super banner advert image
Subscribe to Print Monthly's RSS feed

Enter your email address here to sign up for our weekly newsletter

Blog Post By Brendan Perring

Long live the power of print

Stumbling out into the sunshine from the London Excel and FESPA 2013 I was left without doubt about the now well established importance of wide-format digital print as part of the commercial printer’s arsenal.

Indeed, speaking to visitors and exhibitors alike, one thing is abundantly clear; commercial printers across the globe are investing a lot of money in wide-format print technology. Be it roll-to-roll, flatbed, hybrid, desktop, dye-sublimation, UV, latex, or solvent, the majority I spoke to now see the technology as a logical evolution of their current business, not a major diversification step.

The other two elements being pushed hard at the international show, its biggest ever edition, were software and finishing equipment. The former is an easy step for most commercial print operations, as they are used to dealing with complex pre-press and management information systems. The latter is more of a challenge, and for most requires some additional staff training and production reorganisation. But, at the end of the day, you are still just essentially using a a semi-automated machine to seal material in a plastic film.

My foot-sore conclusion after several days of walking around the Excel’s megalithic halls, and witnessing the number of print houses investing in kit of all kinds, is that our industry is going to evolve and prosper

My foot-sore conclusion after several days of walking around the Excel’s megalithic halls, and witnessing the number of print houses investing in kit of all kinds, is that our industry is going to evolve and prosper. This feeling is confirmed by research published by IBM’s Almaden Research Centre in San Jose California. The company is pioneering new ways of using software tied into Twitter to ‘psychologically profile’ consumers and provide data to marketeers and advertising agencies about how best to reach specific demographics and increase the impact of their campaigns.

The research also finds that in the $170bn (£111.8bn) USA ‘direct marketing’ sector, print generated a 3 percent return, while e-mail marketing only generated 0.1 percent, and online adverts only generated 0.01 percent—the power of print lives on.
sss
Print printer-friendly version Printable version Send to a friend Contact us

No comments found!

Sign in:

Email 

or create your very own Print Monthly account  to join in with the conversation.


Top Right advert image
Top Right advert image

Poll Vote

Has the pandemic affected you?

Top Right advert image

Most Commented

    No blog details found!

Recent Comments

    No blog details found!