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Industry

Concerns over the wording of packaging

A warning has been issued about misleading labelling and the contribution this is having to ‘eco-littering’.

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Confusing labelling is feared to be contributing to eco-littering

According to research conducted by plant-based food and drink packaging company, RawPac, one in five consumers believe it is okay to drop ‘compostable’ packaging on the floor.

However, the firm is campaigning for clearer labelling as the material actually requires specialist recycling facilities to break it down effectively.

Out of 2,000 UK consumers questioned, 18% said they don’t see the benefit in recycling packaging as they believe it will end up in landfill regardless.

Tim Wilson, owner of Manchester-based RawPac comments: “Home composting isn’t suitable for most ‘compostable’ food and drink packaging. This sort of packaging requires a commercial composting facility for it to break down.

“But consumers can be forgiven for being confused. After all, it often says ‘compostable’ on the packaging. That’s why we’ve started calling our own products ‘plant-based’, rather than ‘compostable’. It manages expectations.”

Consumers can be forgiven for being confused. After all, it often says ‘compostable’ on the packaging. That’s why we’ve started calling our own products ‘plant-based’, rather than ‘compostable’.

According to Wilson, one thing that frustrates RawPac customers the most is the lack of consistency across local authorities.

“With some authorities you can recycle certain things that others won’t let you,” he explains, adding: “That applies to green waste too, which requires better provision from local authorities and better awareness among consumers.”

The wording on packaging leading to confusion and frustration raises concerns that consumers will eventually give up their efforts of trying to help the environment and paying attention to what their packaging is made of.

RawPac’s plant-based disposable products are made from renewable, lower carbon or recycled materials such as sugarcane, bamboo, and wood, and can biodegrade completely in under 12 weeks.

If you have any news, please email carys@linkpublishing.co.uk or join in with the conversation on Twitter and LinkedIn.


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