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Industry

Number of female editors rises

After a surge in new female senior editorial roles, more women than ever now edit national newspapers.

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More women than ever are editing newspapers from London’s Fleet Street

Fleet Street, London first made a name for itself for printing and publishing at the beginning of the 16th century and as of the 20th century, most British national newspapers operated from there.

Following a ‘Fleet Street shakeup’, more women than ever before will edit titles from the iconic location.

On Monday 10th February, Victoria Newton took on the role of editor at The Sun in addition to her pre-existing role as editor at The Sun on Sunday.

Alison Phillips became Mirror editor-in-chief following a move to publisher, Reach. As a result Phillips oversees the Sunday Mirror and Sunday People, both of which now fall under the Daily Mirror.

At the time of Khalaf’s promotion from deputy editor to editor of the Financial Times, the New Statesman described the appointment as “a reminder of how unrepresentative the media remains”

The Financial Times appointed Roula Khalaf as its first female editor earlier this year in November, and Emma Tucker took over from Martin Ivens at the Sunday Times.

The total number of female editors working on Fleet Street titles has now grown to five, with Kath Viner having edited Guardian for the last four years.

At the time of Khalaf’s promotion from deputy editor to editor of the Financial Times, the New Statesman described the appointment as “a reminder of how unrepresentative the media remains”.

We are delighted by the swelling of the female ranks at the top and long may it continue to and we wish them great success

The magazine also raised the point that while women are ascending to top roles in more recent times, many of the print newspapers with the largest audiences are still led entirely by men.

The Daily Mail for example, has never been edited by a woman with Geordie Grieg marking the title’s 18th male editor in a row.

Despite this, recent appointments mean that out of 22 audited daily and Sunday UK national newspapers, more than a third are now edited by women.

Speaking to Press Gazette, Women in Journalism chairman, Eleanor Mills comments: “We have been campaigning for more women at the top of newspapers for 25 years. We are delighted by the swelling of the female ranks at the top and long may it continue to and we wish them great success.”



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